Thumper…

January 24, 2018

Nepal day 7 – Nuwakot

31/3/17

Around the farmhouse are a few villages and plenty of hills. We went for a walk around both this morning, but at a much more leisurely pace. There is plenty of damage here from the earthquake, some has been rebuilt, much hasn’t. There are many temporary structures still, houses with tin rooves instead of the usual tiles and houses that were more than one storey now reduced to one. Partial structures that were once homes are still attached to the existing dwellings, but clearly uninhabitable. They are not fixed simply because they can’t afford to fix it. After the earthquake struck, the government gave the people 200,000 nepal rupee each to help rebuild. That’s about $2500 AUD (I guess that is home owners). Even though you can buy more for the dollar here, it still doesn’t go very far. They also toughened building restrictions, meaning many had to start again anyway. Many haven’t in the outlying villages and they still dwell in the temporary buildings.

Houses on the hill

Houses on the hill

There were plenty of goats in this village and surrounding areas, left here to roam free – nobody steals them either. The villagers live a simple life – there’s no roads to most of the houses higher up, they have water – not running, gathered from a well, an outside toilet and maybe a one or two roomed house. Most have a plot of land to farm, barely subsistence farming. A few have started to establish a bit more of a larger farm, particularly chooks, but it wasn’t so evident in this area. The main difference between the goats here and the goats in Uganda is their end destination. The males are more valued in Nepal and become a sacrifice at the temple and are not eaten. The males in Uganda aren’t worth much and all of them end up as food.

Local goats

Local goats

On top of one of the hills there’s a bit of a lookout tower (actually I think it may be the framework for a temple). It’s not finished, I suspect may never be, but you can climb 2/3 of it and get a good view of the surrounding area. Of course we saw a few hills dotted by villages and a little further in the distance, the usual fog.

Hindu shrine

Hindu shrine

The walk back to the main village and palace/temple area was down hill and fairly easy. We passed a school and hospital at Ashok Batika, the kids at the school more than happy to pose for photos (on the other camera). We all commented on the fact that you could wander through the school, it really had no fences at all and how different it was to home. The main street of the main village used to be a row of 2-4 storey houses. Now it’s a row of single storey houses with tin rooves, interspersed with areas of rubble that used to be houses and shops. The main temple and palace was damaged enough to make it unsafe, but not enough to demolish it. They both sit there until funds are found to restore it, although I think work had started on the temple.
It’s amazing how some buildings remain, some don’t, some get rebuilt, some don’t. I guess whether they’re rebuilt or not could also have something to do with who survived and who didn’t as well.

Main Street, Nuwakot

Main Street, Nuwakot

What was left of the afternoon was spent hanging around the farm house, enjoying the view, their vegetable gardens and having a bit of a rest.
The view from our small doorway was pretty cool and the pink rhododendrons, which is the Nepalese national flower, provided a perfect frame.

Pink rhododendrons at the Nuwakot Famous Farm

Pink rhododendrons at the Nuwakot Famous Farm

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